Thanksgiving



Thanksgiving is my favorite thing to do, but not my favorite holiday. It is strangely focused on food, and most of this food is too sweet to my Polish taste. But being thankful is a life-saving attitude that we all should practice. Here are the Poetry Laurels links to poems and reflections about Thanksgiving:

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-are-we-thankful-for-autumn-leaves.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2013/06/on-henry-brants-music-stand-and-summer.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2012/11/on-virtues-and-gratitude-in-time-for.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2012/03/on-golden-hands-of-mercy.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2012/02/on-manna-dead-sea-and-divine.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2011/10/from-grief-to-thanksgiving.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2011/08/living-in-moment.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2011/06/on-importance-of-compassion.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2010/10/my-sky-poem-of-found-images.html

http://poetrylaurels.blogspot.com/2010/10/in-praise-awe-of-mountains.html


On the Moonrise Press Blog, I started a series on entries dedicated to the translations of my poem, Memento Vitae. Here's the poem in English and the links to various translations are below:





The anthology of poetry on religious and spiritual themes, Meditations on Divine Names, has been published as a print book and an e-book. The 140 poems by 64 poets are organized into the following sections: Naming, Names, Earth, Water, Air, Fire, He, She, Being, Loving. This framework avoids the conventional divisions into Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, or Light and Darkness, or Yahweh, Allah, and Christ, or Father, Son and the Holy Spirit. Similarly, there is no separation of poems into different religious denominations and spiritual traditions. Different themes are intertwined in each poem and their order follows thematic threads within each section - bread, sunlight, birth, mothering...

The poets belong to different religions or religious denominations. They see the manifestations of the divine in many aspects of life - personal prayer, religious ceremonies, singing of psalms, family relationships, nature, sun, sky, bread making, loving, and love making. They admire the colors of the sky and the liquid nourishment of water. The clarity of mountain air and the gentleness of human touch. From the four letters of YHWH to Lada or Pele, the anthology catalogs some unusual divine names. Poets reflect on the act of naming, the facts of knowing and unknowing of our God(s). They give testimony to their hopes and beliefs, and share what they find beautiful and inspirational, or, sometimes, disturbing. There is darkness around and death, but the poets look for ways to ascend above, to illumination. 


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